Fermented food for life

Tag: cultured

Fermented Fennel, A Simple Adaptation (vegan, paleo, keto)

Fermented Fennel, A Simple Adaptation (vegan, paleo, keto)

I have been fiddling around a lot with baked goods of late, to the chagrin of my insides, I think. I have had a few Fennel recipes in the works but this week I am posting an adaptation of Sorella‘s Fermented Fennel, which is featured […]

Chocolate Espresso Super Muffins, No Foolin' (Paleo, No Sugar)

Chocolate Espresso Super Muffins, No Foolin' (Paleo, No Sugar)

No Sugar, Paleo, Chocolate, Espresso, Nut-free, Keto-Cycling Protein Muffins This is a recipe I have been working on for months, trying to come up with a guilt-free antioxidant and protein rich breakfast muffin.  It came out of the time of year when the greens do […]

Cultured Turnips (vegan, paleo, keto)

Cultured Turnips (vegan, paleo, keto)

Fermented Turnips

I did this recipe in a 1 Liter Kilner swing top canning jar but you can adjust proportions to your liking.

Fermenting lids and weights are helpful but you can do this with stainless steel, plastic lids or a swing top like this one as it allows air out but not in. In place of a weight you will need a sanitized jar small enough to insert on top of the turnips. Another trick is to fill a clean ziplock back with water and stuff it in. You’ll want to set it on a plate as it will leak fluids in this case.

Ingredients:

Method:

  1. Make sure all your tools are clean and washed with hot soapy water and rinsed.
  2. You can sanitize your jars in the dishwasher but I tend to put mine in the oven.  I set it to 180 degrees Fahrenheit (the lowest temp) and place my jars and weights on a cookie sheet with a silicone baking mat to prevent slipping.  I leave them in at that temperature for 2-5 minutes while I’m prepping the veg.
  3. Remove leaves and “tail” with a clean knife.
  4. You can use a mandolin or a sharp chef’s knife and slice the turnips thinly and evenly or dice them into cubes.  I used a spiralizer for this batch.
  5. Fill your sanitized jar with washed, unpeeled and prepped turnips.
  6. Leave 2″ room at the top for placing the fermenting weight… and you’ll still want 1″ room to prevent overflow, but the clip top will prevent explosions.
  7. Add 1 tablespoon pink salt or sea salt to the top and fill with warm non-chlorinated water. Insert sanitized jar or weight to keep vegetables submerged. Close lid.
  8. If you do not have fermenting or swing lids, set the lid loosely and cover with a towel to keep bacteria out. Wait 3-7 days, depending on your taste.
An Aubergine Story: Cultured Smoky Eggplant Dip

An Aubergine Story: Cultured Smoky Eggplant Dip

This is a recipe I have been anticipating for a couple of years now. There are a couple ways to do this. I would consider this the trickier but as I have yet to try the other method we will go with it. Let’s call […]

Simple Kimchi (keto, paleo, vegan)

Simple Kimchi (keto, paleo, vegan)

Recently I was up in Washington visiting one of my oldest friends. No, she’s not old. Well she’s my age so that’s debatable I guess. We were best friends in High School and have this eerily coincidental relationship. No mind reading but we used to […]

Fermented Aubergine (Eggplant)

Fermented Aubergine (Eggplant)

I adore baba ghanoush. Actually I adore MY baba ghanoush. Which I always begin by smoking the tar out of a pile of eggplant. I met this vegetable on a pizza in the south of France and it was called an aubergine, so forgive me if I keep it that way. It sounds WAY more appetizing than eggplant, which is probably why I had never eaten one before. It was also the best pizza I had ever eaten until I began making my own and modeling it after the one I had enjoyed at “L’aubergine” restaurant in Provence. Apparently they liked the funny little veg-fruit too.

Well, I love grilling it with with sea salt and sprayed with a bit of extra virgin olive oil. It comes alive smoked, I’m telling you. But as most veg come alive through fermentation as well, I thought I’d give it a try.

Day 7 ferment

Ingredients

  • 3 Aubergine (eggplant) rinsed, quartered and cut into chunks
  • 1/2 onion sliced and diced
  • 4-6 cloves garlic, smashed or sliced
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika, smokey ancho chili or red chili flakes
  • 2 Tbsp kosher salt dissolved in 1 quart water (repeat in proportion if necessary)
  • 68oz mason (I used to have a ton of these before I moved overseas… le sigh…) or big pickle jar

You can add other herbs, but I wanted this as close to basic as possible because as I said… I love to make baba ghanoush. Consider this the prequel to that post! I’ve recently started making a Romanian flavor profile version by leaving the coriander and mint off and adding roasted onion. SO good.

Cultured Barbecue Sauce… Minus the Nasties

Cultured Barbecue Sauce… Minus the Nasties

One of the first things I learned to ferment was barbecue sauce. I had always wanted to give it a go, but my newfound resistance to refined sugars and the discovery that I could inject nearly any food with probiotics naturally put me over the […]

Cultured Black Bean Dip (vegan, paleo hacked)

Cultured Black Bean Dip (vegan, paleo hacked)

When I was in N. Ireland learning to be frugal (FRUGAL FRUGAL) I started fermenting beans like crazy. Because beans are cheap, dried beans are cheaper and fermenting makes everything better. In the case of beans, fermenting not only tastes great but it eats up […]

Easy Fermented Carrots (vegan, paleo, keto)

Easy Fermented Carrots (vegan, paleo, keto)

Most people know these as those pickled carrots you can sometimes get in really authentic Mexican restaurants.  And “pickled” is appropriate, or at least used to be an appropriate term for fermenting carrots.  These days pickling often refers to a method of preserving vegetables in vinegar… or even sugar (gasp!).  But before the Industrial Revolution, we called upon the wild yeasts to help us keep our food through winter.  I prefer this method as you get a punch of good gut bacteria to aid you.

A few quart masons or a 2 Liter swing top and some fermenting lids and weights are helpful but you can do this with loosely fitted plastic lids or swing top lids and a sanitized little jar small enough to insert on top of the veg. On occasion I have used a sterile ziplock filled with water and stuffed it on top of the vegetables.

For this recipe I used a 2 liter Kilner jar and aided my ferment with some cultured juice from a friend as I was having trouble with my carrots due to some lively unidentified wild yeasts.

On salt method: below I have shown a method involving making the brine and pouring over the top. Once you get the hang of fermenting though you will be able to just add the salt to the top and pour the water over. Typically, I will use 1-2 Tablespoons of salt per quart. Some people use more… and in hot weather I find it is more effective to add a little more to keep the yeast down. You may get a slight white film on your vegetables or on the top. This is normal but somewhat unappealing. It is called Kahm’s yeast. You can scrape it off and it is not harmful like mold but I don’t know anyone really who likes the stuff. If you are having trouble with it in your ferments you could have competing wild yeasts in your home, or simply not enough salt for those particular vegetables. If you’re nervous, err on the side of caution and add a little more salt. As a principle, in the winter I will add 1-1/2 Tbsp salt per quart to carrots, and in the summer I will use 1 1/2-2 Tbsp per quart.

Ingredients: 

Method: 

  1. Lay all your tools on a cookie sheet with a silicone baking mat in the oven and heat to 180F to sanitize everything.
  2. Peel, rinse and chop your carrots either into sticks or rounds to desired thickness (we did both because littles were helping)
  3. Fill your sanitized jar with washed, unpeeled (if organic, peeled if not) and sliced carrots, leaving a couple inches room at the top.
  4. Dissolve 1 1/2 – 2 tablespoons sea salt per 2 cups non-chlorinated water and pour over the top, repeating until all your veg is covered. (I added the borrowed ferment liquid to top mine off)
  5. Insert sanitized jar or weight to keep vegetables submerged. Close lid. If you do not have fermenting or swing lids, cover with a towel to keep bacteria out. 
  6. Wait 2-7 days, depending on your taste. 
  7. Save the juice for other ferments!

Fermented carrots are simple easy and our whole family loves them. Sometimes I throw in a jalapeƱo, garlic or something fun but I find my family prefers it simple.  

Rainbow carrots fermenting in 68oz pickle jars!
Green Giant Kale & Broccoli Fermented Hummus (Vegan, Paleo Hacked)

Green Giant Kale & Broccoli Fermented Hummus (Vegan, Paleo Hacked)

Above: the jolly green giant hummus topped with organic hempseed for protein and fancy pants presentation. Green Giant Kale & Broccoli Fermented Hummus Sooo…. Thanksgiving happened.  Sandwiched between having a wicked flu myself and dealing with a full night and day of helicopter vomit with […]